Nice list of Aliases for .bashrc

$cat .bashrc
# .bashrc

# Source global definitions
if [ -f /etc/bashrc ]; then
 . /etc/bashrc
fi

# Uncomment the following line if you don't like systemctl's auto-paging feature:
# export SYSTEMD_PAGER=

# User specific aliases and functions
alias cp='cp -iv' # Preferred 'cp' implementation
alias mv='mv -iv' # Preferred 'mv' implementation
alias mkdir='mkdir -pv' # Preferred 'mkdir' implementation
alias ll='ls -FGlAhp' # Preferred 'ls' implementation
alias la='ll -FGlAhpa' # Preferred 'ls -a' implementation
alias less='less -FSRXc' # Preferred 'less' implementation
cd() { builtin cd "$@"; ll; } # Always list directory contents upon 'cd'
alias cd..='cd ../' # Go back 1 directory level (for fast typers)
alias ..='cd ../' # Go back 1 directory level
alias ...='cd ../../' # Go back 2 directory levels
alias .3='cd ../../../' # Go back 3 directory levels
alias .4='cd ../../../../' # Go back 4 directory levels
alias .5='cd ../../../../../' # Go back 5 directory levels
alias .6='cd ../../../../../../' # Go back 6 directory levels
alias findall='find / -name' # find on the whole filesystem
alias sudo="sudo " # A trailing space in value causes the next word to be checked for alias substitution when the alias is expanded

# lr: Full Recursive Directory Listing
# ------------------------------------------
alias lr='ls -R | grep ":$" | sed -e '\''s/:$//'\'' -e '\''s/[^-][^\/]*\//--/g'\'' -e '\''s/^/ /'\'' -e '\''s/-/|/'\'' | less'

# showa: to remind yourself of an alias (given some part of it)
# ------------------------------------------------------------
 showa () { /usr/bin/grep --color=always -i -a1 $@ ~/Library/init/bash/aliases.bash | grep -v '^\s*$' | less -FSRXc ; }

alias mypubip='curl -s ipinfo.io/ip' # mypubip: Public facing IP Address

alias openPorts='ss -t -a -l' # openPorts: List Listening TCP ports

# ii: display useful host related informaton
# -------------------------------------------------------------------
 ii() {
 echo -e "\nYou are logged on ${RED}$HOST"
 echo -e "\nAdditionnal information:$NC " ; uname -a
 echo -e "\n${RED}Users logged on:$NC " ; w -h
 echo -e "\n${RED}Current date :$NC " ; date
 echo -e "\n${RED}Machine stats :$NC " ; uptime
 echo -e "\n${RED}Public facing IP Address :$NC " ;mypubip
 echo
 }

# httpDebug: Download a web page and show info on what took time
# -------------------------------------------------------------------
 httpDebug () { /usr/bin/curl $@ -o /dev/null -w "dns: %{time_namelookup} connect: %{time_connect} pretransfer: %{time_pretransfer} starttransfer: %{time_starttransfer} total: %{time_total}\n" ; }

Install GUI on Ubuntu 14.04

Pretty simple.  You want to add a visual interface to your Ubuntu server.

Firstly, update the APT package manager

sudo apt-get update

Install a minimal Unity desktop

sudo apt-get install --no-install-recommends ubuntu-desktop

GUI should now be installed, reboot to take effect.

sudo reboot

This is what is looks like upon reboot (after login)
unity

To get to a TTY terminal.
For Text Mode
Ctrl-Alt-F1(-F6)
for GUI Mode
Ctrl-Alt-F7

Installing Webmin on ubuntu

To install Webmin via apt-get you will have to add it to your repository:

sudo nano /etc/apt/sources.list

Go to the end and add this to the file:

deb http://download.webmin.com/download/repository sarge contrib
deb http://webmin.mirror.somersettechsolutions.co.uk/repository sarge contrib

Save the file.  Ctrl-X, Yes, Enter.

After performing the above actions, you need to get the GPG key the repository is signed with. So for that type in the following commands:

cd /root
wget http://www.webmin.com/jcameron-key.asc
apt-key add jcameron-key.asc

After adding the GPG key you need to update the source.list:

sudo apt-get update

Now you can install Webmin by typing:

sudo apt-get install webmin

Or alternatively you can try downloading the actual .deb file:

wget http://prdownloads.sourceforge.net/webadmin/webmin_1.750_all.deb

This will download the .deb file on to the system, then you should:

dpkg --install webmin_1.750_all.deb

This will install Webmin on your system.
Login to Webmin
Open up the browser and type in you IP address with as following:

https://your_ip:10000/
OR
https://localhost:10000/

You will get a warning for the SSL certificate, you may just proceed ignoring that warning. After you have navigated to the above URL you will get the following login page:

Log in with root user name and password.

Simple boto.cfg example file

This file can be place in either:

/etc/boto.cfg for system wide

$HOME/.boto for user specific


 

 

cat /etc/boto.cfg
# boto.cfg
# python boto config file - system wide settings

[Credentials]
# <AWS account name>
aws_access_key_id = <access_key_id>
aws_secret_access_key = <secret_key_id>

[Boto]
#debug = 0
#num_retries = 10
#
#proxy = myproxy.com
#proxy_port = 8080
#proxy_user = foo
#proxy_pass = bar